Carve It (A Better Bevel)

04-08.CarveIt
Looking to create a beveled edge? The built-in bevel filter doesn’t work on text. Instead, you’ll need to use the channels to create the edge.

1 Choose Effect>Video Filters>Channel>Channel Offset.

2 Switch the Channel to move only the Alpha Channel.

3 Offset the channel to taste, usually a value of three to ten pixels for the X and Y axis will work, but you may need to vary this based on the size of your graphic.

4 Experiment with the Edges settings to refine your look.




fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






Lose That Umlaut (Symbolically Speaking, Of Course)

04-02.umlaut

Need special characters but can’t remember where they live on the keyboard? OS X has a great feature for this—the Character Palette.

1 Go to System Preferences > International > Input Menu, and enable the Character Palette.

2 Notice the new icon in your menu bar (likely a flag that matches the language). When needed, simply click it and choose Show or Hide Character Palette.

3 The palette automatically floats above your active application.

4 Be sure to check that you’re using the same font in the text generator or other application.

5 Double-click or drag to use the special character.




fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






Retro is Not Always Cool

05-10.RetroNot
Most transitions have hard edges; that looks bad enough. Avoid the temptation to add a colored border, or you’ll really be traveling back to the days of clunky tapes that were heavier than a MacBook. Instead, try feathering the edges and adjusting the width of the border. In our experience, the client will find the effect far more pleasing.

Want some retro wipes, then try out these:
• Wrap Wipe
• Zig Zag Wipe
• Venetian Blind Wipe





fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






Gradient Wipe

05-00.5.GW
The Gradient Wipe is the most useful transition inside Final Cut Pro (after a Dissolve of course). Don’t be turned off by how the effect looks on its own; without an image dropped in the well, it’s useless. The effect creates a transition between two clips by using a luminance map. The transition will occur between the darkest and lightest areas in the map. Why is this so cool? You can create as many transitions as you like using graphic files. Make your own or download away.



fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






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