The Dividing Line—Part 2

10-05aDivLine2-1
Several different options are available when dragging within the Timeline.

When dragging in the Timeline, use these tips:

  • Dragging in the Timeline horizontally results in an overwrite edit by default.
    • Dragging in the Timeline horizontally results in an insert or swap edit when you hold down the Option key.
    • Dragging in the Timeline vertically results in an overwrite edit by default.
    • Dragging in the Timeline vertically results in an insert edit when you press the Option key after you start to drag.
    • Pressing the Option key and then dragging in the Timeline vertically results in a cloned copy added to the Timeline via an insert edit.
    • Pressing the Option and Shift keys and then dragging in the Timeline vertically results in a cloned copy added to the Timeline directly above the clip.





fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






The Dividing Line—Part 1

10-04Divideline1
When dragging tracks in the Timeline, where you drag is as important as what you drag. Careless dragging may result in an unintended overwrite edit when you intended
an insert edit.

If you look closely at the Timeline, you’ll notice that it’s divided by a thin gray line. When dragging, look to see which region you enter to determine the edit type.

When dragging from the Viewer or a bin, use these tips:

  • Dragging to the upper-third of the track results in an insert edit.
    • Dragging to the lower two-thirds of the track results in an overwrite edit.





fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






Quiet Down! Reducing Noise in Your Clip

Ch09_Reduce Noise
Background noise? Air conditioning rumble? Soundtrack Pro makes it easy to fix. By combining the Set Noise Print and Reduce Noise commands you can dramatically improve a clip.

  1. Select a clip in your Final Cut Pro Timeline.
    2 Right-click and choose Send To > Soundtrack Pro Audio Project File. The audio moves from your Timeline into Soundtrack Pro.
  2. Zoom into a part of your audio file that contains just the background noise that you’d like to remove. Select the audio in the Soundtrack Pro Timeline.
    4 Choose Process > Noise Reduction > Set Noise Print. The noise print identifies the frequencies that you’d like to remove from the file.
  3. Select the audio in the Timeline that you’d like to repair (this will usually be the entire Timeline).
    6 Choose Process > Noise Reduction > Reduce Noise. The Reduce Noise dialog appears.
  4. Click the Preview button (play icon) to hear the noise reduction previewed.
    8 Drag the Noise Threshold slider left to lower the threshold, or drag it right to raise the threshold.
  5. Drag the Reduction slider to the right to increase the amount of noise reduction.
    10 Use the Tone Control slider left to preserve more of the bass or treble content.
  6. To toggle a before and after state, click the Bypass button.
    12 When satisfied, click the Apply button.




fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






CDs Get Converted

itunes
Our favorite way to rip and up-convert music from stock music CDs is to use iTunes.
We all know music CDs are recorded at a sampling rate of 44.1kHz. Final Cut Pro and digital video love to work at a sampling rate of 48kHz. Yes, we know Final Cut Pro can up-sample on the fly, but why waste CPU power that could be going to your real-time video playback?

Here’s all you need to do:

  1. Open iTunes.
    2 Open Preferences under the Edit menu.
  2. Click the Advanced icon in the toolbar then choose Importing.
  3. Under Import Using, select AIFF Encoder.
    5 Under Setting, select Custom.
  4. Another dialog box opens. Here, select a sample rate of 48.000 kHz. Click OK and then OK again.
    7 Now click the General button.
  5. Under iTunes Music Folder Location, change it to target your desktop. (This will make it real easy to find and move your newly ripped tracks.)
    9 Pop in your CD. If you’re connected to the Internet, iTunes will go to the CDDB and grab the album name and track names. (Yes, it seem as if most of our library music is listed in the CDDB.) This is great because most of the work is done. Create a playlist of all the tracks you want to rip.
  6. Click Import, and you’re done!

Once you’ve set up your preferences, just “rip and roll” every time you need to grab a music cut. Fast, easy, elegant…and of course…cool.




fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






A Little Louder Please…

08-23littlelouder

Need to tweak the mix a little? You can quickly change the volume of a highlighted track from the keyboard. Use the following keyboard combinations to perfect the mix:

  • Gain –3db Control [
  • Gain –1db Control –
  • Gain +1db Control +
  • Gain +3db Control ]




fcpbook

Like this tip? It comes from the book
Final Cut Studio On the Spot from Focal Press.






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